1. disfiguredstick:

    typette:

    jayeryane:

    typette:

    vandigo:

    redsuns-n-orangemoons:

    shybairnsget-nowt:

    americas-liberty:

    Students Fed Up With Michelle Obama’s School Lunch Overhaul — Menu-Item Snapshots Spell Out Why

    Wow that is depressing. 

    okay but is that michelle’s fault for pushing for healtheir lunches or is it school districts’ faults for cutting corner by cutting calories but not making lunch any healthier?

    let’s look into it.

    Yes, thank you. Because yes she is pushing for a healthier lunch, but the schools still value football over feeding their students, which means that instead of providing enough healthy food to keep their students from starving, they are cutting down the amount of food available to fit within the caloric requirements … while then taking the money they saved to re-sod the football field for the third year in a row. Maybe new uniforms.

    she LITERALLY chose the menus for all of these schools.

    I dunno though the roll and shepherd’s pie would be pretty good with some ketchup I bet though

    Can you show me the the source where you learned she personally picked these menus?

    I’m curious to know.

    I was kidding, there are probably hundreds of thousands of highschools if not more in the US

    How much do American school kids normally eat?? It’s pretty average here to have a drink, a sandwich or “main meal” component and something small on the side.. Like a muesli bar or something. We don’t have ‘set lunches’ here anyways. 

     
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    H/T to 
@atheist_teen_

    H/T to 

    @atheist_teen_

     
  3. image: Download

    
Republicans have talking points. We have facts, and facts don’t lie. #GetCovered #pfla pic.twitter.com/twNvkFqIe0
— FL Democratic Party (@FlaDems) March 28, 2014
     
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Diversity of professional backgrounds matters for the same reasons as racial or gender diversity. Like all human beings, judges are the product of their background and experiences, including their professional lives before taking the bench. When a judge decides whether a claim is “plausible,” or whether a witness is “credible,” or whether police officers, when they stopped and searched a pedestrian, acted “reasonably,” her determination is necessarily colored by the nature of her work as a lawyer up to that point. And when an individual who has faced workplace discrimination, contaminated drinking water, or civil rights violations by police enters a courtroom, her faith that she will get a fair hearing is enhanced by a judiciary that includes judges who once represented people like her.

As Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) put it at a forum Alliance for Justice sponsored on the issue in February, “It matters that someone has represented people other than corporate clients, that they’ve had real experience with people who can’t afford lawyers, that they’ve had real experience trying to fight for the public interest …. It matters where you come from.”

    Diversity of professional backgrounds matters for the same reasons as racial or gender diversity. Like all human beings, judges are the product of their background and experiences, including their professional lives before taking the bench. When a judge decides whether a claim is “plausible,” or whether a witness is “credible,” or whether police officers, when they stopped and searched a pedestrian, acted “reasonably,” her determination is necessarily colored by the nature of her work as a lawyer up to that point. And when an individual who has faced workplace discrimination, contaminated drinking water, or civil rights violations by police enters a courtroom, her faith that she will get a fair hearing is enhanced by a judiciary that includes judges who once represented people like her.

    As Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) put it at a forum Alliance for Justice sponsored on the issue in February, “It matters that someone has represented people other than corporate clients, that they’ve had real experience with people who can’t afford lawyers, that they’ve had real experience trying to fight for the public interest …. It matters where you come from.”

     
  5. 16:47

    Notes: 49908

    Reblogged from lacienegasmiled

    Tags: musicMichael JacksonBeat Itdemo tape

    Plays: 1,570,045

    lacienegasmiled:

    As Jackson couldn’t fluently play any instruments, he would sing and beatbox out how he wanted his songs to sound by himself on tape, layering the vocals, harmonies and rhythm before having instrumentalists come in to complete the songs.

    One of his engineers Robmix on how Jackson worked: “One morning MJ came in with a new song he had written overnight. We called in a guitar player, and Michael sang every note of every chord to him. “here’s the first chord first note, second note, third note. Here’s the second chord first note, second note, third note”, etc., etc. We then witnessed him giving the most heartfelt and profound vocal performance, live in the control room through an SM57. He would sing us an entire string arrangement, every part. Steve Porcaro once told me he witnessed MJ doing that with the string section in the room. Had it all in his head, harmony and everything. Not just little eight bar loop ideas. he would actually sing the entire arrangement into a micro-cassette recorder complete with stops and fills.”

    Reasons why I laugh when people say he wasn’t a real musician.

    (Source: harrattanparhar)

     
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Last week, the Census put out its annual income and poverty figures for 2012. The big news on the poverty front is that the percentage of Americans living in poverty is unchanged at 15 percent, which amounts to 46.5 million Americans. More than 1 in 5 kids under the age of 18 are in poverty and nearly 1 in 4 kids under the age of 6 find themselves impoverished as well. These are numbers we’ve all become accustomed to, but they can still shock the conscience if you make an effort to soak them in again.
The sheer scale of poverty in the U.S. is so massive that it can seem as if eliminating or dramatically reducing it would be nearly impossible. After all, 46 million people is a lot of people. But in reality, if we stick to the official poverty line, the amount of money standing in the way of poverty eradication is much lower than people realize.
In its annual poverty report, the Census includes a table that few take note of which actually details by how much families are below the poverty line. A little multiplication and addition later, and the magic number pops out. In 2012, the number was $175.3 billion. That is how many dollars it would take to bring every person in the United States up to the poverty line. In 2012, that number was just 1.08% of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), which is to say the overall size of the economy.

Read more at Demos Policyshop.

    Last week, the Census put out its annual income and poverty figures for 2012. The big news on the poverty front is that the percentage of Americans living in poverty is unchanged at 15 percent, which amounts to 46.5 million Americans. More than 1 in 5 kids under the age of 18 are in poverty and nearly 1 in 4 kids under the age of 6 find themselves impoverished as well. These are numbers we’ve all become accustomed to, but they can still shock the conscience if you make an effort to soak them in again.

    The sheer scale of poverty in the U.S. is so massive that it can seem as if eliminating or dramatically reducing it would be nearly impossible. After all, 46 million people is a lot of people. But in reality, if we stick to the official poverty line, the amount of money standing in the way of poverty eradication is much lower than people realize.

    In its annual poverty report, the Census includes a table that few take note of which actually details by how much families are below the poverty line. A little multiplication and addition later, and the magic number pops out. In 2012, the number was $175.3 billion. That is how many dollars it would take to bring every person in the United States up to the poverty line. In 2012, that number was just 1.08% of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), which is to say the overall size of the economy.

    Read more at Demos Policyshop.

     
  7. According to Paul Ryan, it’s those lazy niggers negros blacks thugs inner city men who are to blame for America’s poverty problems:

    House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) previewed his upcoming legislative proposals for reforming America’s poverty programs during an appearance on Bill Bennett’s Morning in America Wednesday, hinting that he would focus on creating work requirements for men “in our inner cities” and dealing with the “real culture problem” in these communities. “We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work, and so there is a real culture problem here that has to be dealt with,” he said. Ryan also cited Charles Murray, a conservative social scientist who believes African-Americans are, as a population, less intelligent than whites due to genetic differences and that poverty remains a national problem because “a lot of poor people are born lazy.”

    That’s it. Nothing about the lack of a decent living wage, lack of decent jobs or how young black Americans are being fed into the Prison-Industrial Complex like coal to a furnace. Just the ages-old trick of riling up the unreconstructed over “those lazy good-fer-nuthins” for a few votes.

    Speaking of pipelines, here’s something to toss in the “Shit Black America Already Knew” pile:

    The social category “children” defines a group of individuals who are perceived to be distinct, with essential characteristics including innocence and the need for protection (Haslam, Rothschild, & Ernst, 2000). The present research examined whether Black boys are given the protections of childhood equally to their peers. We tested 3 hypotheses: (a) that Black boys are seen as less “childlike” than their White peers, (b) that the characteristics associated with childhood will be applied less when thinking specifically about Black boys relative to White boys, and (c) that these trends would be exacerbated in contexts where Black males are dehumanized by associating them (implicitly) with apes (Goff, Eberhardt, Williams, & Jackson, 2008). We expected, derivative of these 3 principal hypotheses, that individuals would perceive Black boys as being more responsible for their actions and as being more appropriate targets for police violence. We find support for these hypotheses across 4 studies using laboratory, field, and translational (mixed laboratory/field) methods. We find converging evidence that Black boys are seen as older and less innocent and that they prompt a less essential conception of childhood than do their White same-age peers. Further, our findings demonstrate that the Black/ape association predicted actual racial disparities in police violence toward children. These data represent the first attitude/behavior matching of its kind in a policing context. Taken together, this research suggests that dehumanization is a uniquely dangerous intergroup attitude, that intergroup perception of children is underexplored, and that both topics should be research priorities.

    No surprise here. We all know how hard it is for mainstream America to see young blacks in the same cherubic light as their own:

    When comparing felony acts by whites, blacks, and Latinos, respondents overestimated black boys’ ages by 4.53 years. Police officers, who were also included in the pool of participants, overestimated their ages by 4.59 years. To put this in more concrete terms, when participants saw a 14 year-old African American boy, they perceived him as an 18 to 19-year-old adult. And the effect of this was to deny the presumption of innocence—after all, adults are seen as fully responsible for their actions. As Bump notes, this goes a long way toward explaining the disciplinary disparity between blacks and whites in public schools. It also helps us understand the generalized fear of black teenagers (see: “the knockout game”) as well as the regular stories of police confrontation and brutality, from the 14-year-old who was choked and beaten for his “dehumanizing stare” to the other 14-year-old who was stopped, frisked, and sexually assaulted. During the George Zimmerman trial, right-wing bloggers circulated a photo of the “real Trayvon Martin” who, in their telling, was a muscled, heavily-tattooed thug, not an innocent 17-year-old. In reality, it was a picture of The Game, a 34-year-old rapper. If you want a clearer illustration of what bias and racism can do to people, there it is.

    In a country that’s 160 years or so removed from seeing blacks as livestock and farming tools (and with a significant portion of it that still see them as such, to varying degrees), this comes as no shock. On a side note, yes, yours truly is aware that CPAC happened. Whenever I get around to surveying the trainwreck that is the Republican Party and its rogues gallery, I’ll do that.

     
  8. liberalsarecool:

kaching:

On Minority

Tea Party heart-throb. Now you know why they are called ‘Red’ states.

And this is why conservatives love Putin. Aside from all the shirtless pics.

    liberalsarecool:

    kaching:

    On Minority

    Tea Party heart-throb. Now you know why they are called ‘Red’ states.

    And this is why conservatives love Putin. Aside from all the shirtless pics.

     
  9. Ladies and gentlemen, Darrel Issa. Nothing more to add.

     
  10. 01:22

    Notes: 611

    Reblogged from cognitivedissonance

    Tags: black pantherNAACPjustice

    image: Download

    thepeoplesrecord:

Former Baltimore Black Panther leader released from prison after more than four decadesMarch 4, 2014
Former Baltimore Black Panther leader Marshall “Eddie” Conway was released from prison on Tuesday. Conway was convicted of gunning down Baltimore City Police officer Donald Sager in 1969. 
Baltimore City NAACP President Tessa Hill-Aston released the following statement; “Today is a monumental day for the thousands of Marylanders and millions around the world that have championed the release of Marshall “Eddie” Conway for a very long time. The release of Conway after four decades of imprisonment is an important page turner in this tragic story.  The Baltimore NAACP has been supporting Conway’s release for decades and now a new chapter begins for Marshall “Eddie” Conway, his family and supporters. Our prayers remain with him as he makes the transition to freedom.” 
On January 15, 1971 Conway was convicted by a Baltimore City jury of the first degree murder of Sager and two counts of assault with intent to murder Baltimore Police officers Stanley Sierakowski and Roger Nolan. He was sentenced to life imprisonment plus 30 years. A ruling handed down by Maryland’s highest court that found jury instructions were unconstitutional up until 1980.
Hundreds of convictions could be affected by the appeal filed by cop killer Merle Unger. Unger has since been retried and remains in prison to this day, sentenced to life. 
According to Conway’s settlement agreement during his incarceration he earned a bachelor’s degree from Coppin University and will now be employed in the field of publishing and printing.
Source

    thepeoplesrecord:

    Former Baltimore Black Panther leader released from prison after more than four decades
    March 4, 2014

    Former Baltimore Black Panther leader Marshall “Eddie” Conway was released from prison on Tuesday. Conway was convicted of gunning down Baltimore City Police officer Donald Sager in 1969.

    Baltimore City NAACP President Tessa Hill-Aston released the following statement; “Today is a monumental day for the thousands of Marylanders and millions around the world that have championed the release of Marshall “Eddie” Conway for a very long time. The release of Conway after four decades of imprisonment is an important page turner in this tragic story.  The Baltimore NAACP has been supporting Conway’s release for decades and now a new chapter begins for Marshall “Eddie” Conway, his family and supporters. Our prayers remain with him as he makes the transition to freedom.”

    On January 15, 1971 Conway was convicted by a Baltimore City jury of the first degree murder of Sager and two counts of assault with intent to murder Baltimore Police officers Stanley Sierakowski and Roger Nolan. He was sentenced to life imprisonment plus 30 years. A ruling handed down by Maryland’s highest court that found jury instructions were unconstitutional up until 1980.

    Hundreds of convictions could be affected by the appeal filed by cop killer Merle Unger. Unger has since been retried and remains in prison to this day, sentenced to life.

    According to Conway’s settlement agreement during his incarceration he earned a bachelor’s degree from Coppin University and will now be employed in the field of publishing and printing.

    Source

     
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    These news publications ain’t shit.

    These news publications ain’t shit.

     
  12. A recent article from the Guardian takes a look at the narrative-du-jour surrounding the Ukraine crisis - namely that of talking heads expounding on President Obama’s supposed failure to “act resolutely” while praising Vladimir Putin’s “decisiveness.” It’s not just the talking heads in D.C. and elsewhere who’ve mastered the ancient art of anal verbosity - GOPers are relishing this opportunity to cast the president as a weakling for not engaging Putin with a healthy helping of bluster and bravado.